Secrets to Marriage: Part 1 Dating

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            As I have said, on numerous occasions, I am no expert on marriage. I have no special degrees, although my BS is as good as the next guy’s. However, our memoir is based on three long-lived marriages totaling over 150 years. Over the years, I have noticed some similarities or patterns. If you are reading our blog on a consistent basis, you are probably at least a hopeful romantic. I mean, despite the increasingly low marriage success rates, you believe that, under the right circumstances, long term marriage success is possible. I thought it might be helpful to share some of my observations.

            Unless you have an arranged marriage, dating was part of the original process. Just a side note: arranged marriages have a fairly high success rate. I believe this is because of ‘common shared beliefs’. Spoiler alert: This is a topic for another blog.

            Dating is all about putting your best foot forward. You like someone and you want to impress them. Typically, you breathe a little harder/more frequently when they are close. You choose your words carefully, trying to make an impression. You may even perform archaic acts like opening car doors and pulling out chairs. Woman paint themselves and try to imitate odoriferous floral arrangements. There are also a lot of hormones involved.

            I watch a lot of nature specials. Generally, the male bird will dance, strut, puff out his plumage, or even build a nest. The female will watch or maybe participate in a dance. If successful, mating will occur. If not, they both go on to the next partner. However, as is our goal, many birds have a single partner for life. Dad and I drive by the Scioto River on most of my visits. We have both noticed that you rarely see a single or un-partnered Canadian goose.

Truly we are not that much different. Perpetuation of the species is the ultimate goal. However, that is low on the list of why we stay together. Humans are a fairly intelligent species (with some exceptions: reference Washington DC news), and as such have higher level needs. According to Maslow, above our basic needs we have needs such as intimacy, self-esteem or self-realization, and even self-actualization or reaching our full potential. Ideally, a good marriage will help each partner reach these.

I believe that if you don’t grow together, you grow apart. A marriage takes a lot of time and commitment. It is hard work and effort. However, if that is all there is in your marriage, you are in for a rough and probably short ride. You need to make time for yourselves. Have some fun and reconnect. Remind yourselves of why you committed to each other in the first place.

Never stop dating, preferably your spouse (kidding – only your spouse). My parents became world travelers after dad retired. They went around the country, including eleven trips to Hawaii. They also visited Europe half a dozen times. And they had a membership to the Chicago Metropolitan Opera. Crystal’s parents enjoyed dining and dancing at the Moose lodge, not unlike the USO dance where they met. They also enjoyed entertaining and socializing with their many friends. Crystal and I have always made time to be together. We enjoy movies, dinners, walks in nature and B&Bs. We recently spent a night at an alpaca farm B&B near Zanesville, Ohio. It was a great experience.

So let’s be honest. Married dating isn’t like single dating. It’s not a mating ritual. It’s about building a better bond. It’s about improving communications. It’s about getting away. It’s about having fun and relieving stress. If a little mating takes place occasionally, so be it (and Yeah!). At any rate, it’s time to stop reading and time to plan your next date.

Crystal at the Alpaca Farm/B&B Spring 2019

Category: Make Marriage Last

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